Video Lesson – Food Vocabulary (British & American English)

Lesson Overview

Lesson Summary 

Have you ever been confused by two different English nouns that are names for the same thing? Think, tomato sauce and ketchup, or chips and french fries!

In this video lesson, Emma explains some of the differences between British and American English Vocabulary. That’s right – there are different English nouns for the same types of food, depending on where you are in the world! Arrrrgh!
Learn and practise your vocabulary with Emma!


Video Transcript
Section 1
Hi everyone! I’m Emma and welcome to another lesson at mmmEnglish!

Have you ever been confused by two different English nouns that mean the same thing? In today’s lesson we’re going to look at the differences between British and American English vocabulary. That’s right – there are different names for the same thing in English, depending on where you are in the world! For example, In Australia, where I’m from, we use words from British and American English!!

Let’s have a look at an example:

This is a bottle of lemonade. In British English, it is fizzy drink. So, fizzy drink can be lemonade, Coca-cola, Pepsi, Fanta – sweet drinks with bubbles inside. So, in British English, it’s fizzy drink. In American English, this is soda pop, or even just ‘pop(or ‘soda’).

Let’s look at some more examples:

Do you know what these are? In British English these are crisps. In American English, they’re chips.

I know you know these ones! In British English these are chips. In American English, these are French fries.

In British English this is a jacket potato. In American English, it’s a baked potato.

In British English this is an aubergine. In American English, it’s eggplant.

In British English this is a courgette. In American English, it’s a zucchini.

In British English this is rocket. In American English, it’s arugala.

In British English this is a biscuit. In American English, it’s a cookie.

In British English this is called pudding. It’s the meal you eat after dinner and it’s usually sweet. In American English, it’s called dessert.

In British English these are sweets. In American English, it’s candy.

In British English this is takeaway food. It’s food that you buy from a restaurant but you don’t eat at the restaurant, you take it away. In American English, it’s take-out food.

In British English this is candy floss. In American English, it’s cotton candy.

Can you remember what these are? In British English these are cans of fizzy drink. In American English, these are cans of soda pop.

Ok, let’s practice! First, you try first and then listen to me. Do you remember what these are?

  1. Crisps or chips.
  2. Chips or French fries.
  3. Jacket potato or baked potato.
  4. Aubergine or eggplant.
  5. Courgette or zucchini.

The British English names for these vegetables are actually French words. Aubergine and courgette are French words.

  1. This is rocket or arugula.
  2. Biscuit or cookie.
  3. Pudding or dessert.
  4. Sweets or candy.
  5. Takeaway Food or takeout food.
  6. Candy floss or cotton candy.
  7. Fizzy drink or soda pop.

Well done! That was great pronunciation practice. The trick is to learn and practice just one of these nouns. Are you learning British or American English? Choose the noun that is most important for you, but remember that there is another one so that you don’t get confused.

Do you want me to send you a cheat sheet to help you learn and practice these nouns at home? Click here to download it.

I hope you enjoyed this lesson. You can also find more video lessons and courses on my website at mmmEnglish. And subscribe to my YouTube Channel to make sure you get the latest videos. Until I see you next time at mmmEnglish, Bye for now!

BRITISH ENGLISH AMERICAN ENGLISH
Aubergine Eggplant
Crisps Chips
Chips French Fries
Jacket potato Baked potato
Courgette Zuccini
Rocket Arugala
Biscuit Cookie
Pudding Dessert
Sweets Candy
Takeaway Take out
Candy floss Cotton Candy
Fizzy drink Soda pop

Links mentioned in the video

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